The Little Red Caboose, Episode 10, Storytime Seedlings Podcast

 

 
 
 

WHAT WE TALKED ABOUT: 

1. Picture Books

2. Fingerplays, Songs and a Story


3. Early Literacy Tip for Parents

EPISODE 10:

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1. PICTURE BOOKS

 
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Cat Goes Fiddle-I-Fee
Adapted and illustrated by Paul Galdone


An old English rhyme names all the animals a farm boy feeds on his daily rounds.

 
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There's a Hole in the Log on the Bottom of the Lake 
by Loren Long


An adaptation of the traditional folk song, "There's a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea," by Sylvia Fine, with additional repetition and tongue twisters. Includes sheet music.

 

2. FINGERPLAYS, SONGS AND A STORY

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3. EARLY LITERACY TIP FOR PARENTS

 Cultural Literacy and History

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(There's a Hole in the Log on the Bottom of the Lake, illustration from the book, by Loren Long)

     In Episode 10:  The Little Red Caboose, the Pre-Literacy Tip is on the importance of the history of our old songs. Many old songs have a history going back generations, a history that is sometime based in old stereotypes and prejudices or has been culturally appropriated.  Knowing a song’s true history allows it to live in truth in our heart, mind and spirit—encouraging ownership of all that we are, good or bad, light or dark. Only in knowing our past can we have a present and a future that is based in understanding and empathy and forgiveness.

      When your child is old enough and, you feel they are ready, you can help them to understand a song by telling them the truth of its history.  For example, the Shortnin’ Bread song in episode 9 is believed by some to have been a plantation song of the slave or black American experience in the South.  However with further research, I found that Shortin’ Bread was written in 1900 by the white American poet, James Whitcomb Riley from Indiana. Riley infused it with stereotypical dialect and imagery.  Through time, the song has been re-formed, the dialect and stereotype erased into a more family friendly and delightful song.

     As I wrote in Episode 9: “If you are new to America and first experience this song as an adult, you are weaving the song into your own attachment to your new home and community and to your child’s growing up in our country. 

    Cultural literacy is having a knowledge base, a capital, a currency in the day to day popular songs and stories that connect us to one another.  A community, a country, is only as strong and healthy in what common threads of connection we all share, no matter our differences.”

 
    No matter the history, whether dark or light, it’s our complex truth and what we are as Americans. 
                          See you at Storytime, Lauren
 
 

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(There's a Hole in the Log on the Bottom of the Lake, illustration from the book, by Loren Long)
 
 
 

Storytime Seedlings Podcaster (and Children's Librarian):

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    Hi, I'm Lauren!

I do the following storytimes:

Babies--
Baby Bouncers Lapsit,
a program for infants with a caregiver.*
  --- and ---
Preschoolers--
3's & 4's Budding Bookworms 
(Stories and Songs 
for 3, 4, and 5 year olds).*
   
​ **Evaluations needed:
After you listen to episode 10
please let us know what you think and
 take this quick survey! Thanks!
We appreciate your input.
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Our thanks to the following resources for Episode 10:

Free Music Archive and Scott Holmes (music) 
Pete Seeger's American Folk, Game and Activity Songs for Children

There's a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea, Sung by Danny Kaye 

Little Red Caboose from "200 of the Greatest Nursery Rhymes" by  Sugar Kane Music
Rock-A-Bye Baby from Little Children Sleep Well, Native American Lullabies
You are My Sunshine by the Pine Ridge Boys, 1939 


Little Red Caboose, Head Start Child Development Center,  Mississippi, 1967

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